Kevin Rose

Assistant Professor, General Faculty

Education

  • BA, Wheaton College
  • MDiv, Duke Divinity School
  • PhD, University of Virginia

Research Interests

I am a historian of religion in the United States focusing on the relationship between religion, capitalism, and the environment in the twentieth century. In addition to my Religious Studies research and teaching, I also serve as an Association Dean, advising and supporting undergraduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences.

My first book project, tentatively titled Lifestyle Religion: Green Consumer Choice in a Neoliberal Climate traces the rise of mainstream Protestant environmentalism in the 1970s, focusing on the concept of “Christian lifestyle” and how its circulation helped popularize apolitical, market-friendly forms of environmental practice. My writing on this topic has also appeared in Religion and American Culture: A Journal of Interpretation and the American Quarterly. I also enjoy translating my research for more popular venues, which I have done primarily in podcast form through work with the Race, Religion, and Democracy lab, here (hyperlink: https://religionlab.virginia.edu/podcast/what-would-krishna/) and here (hyperlink: https://religionlab.virginia.edu/podcast/field-notes-sticky-situation/).

Teaching

  • Christianity and Ecology 
  • Religion in America since 1865
  • Global America

Selected Publications

“Lotuses in Muddy Water: Fracked Gas and the Hare Krishnas at New Vrindaban, West Virginia,” in American Quarterly 72:3 (2020)

“‘The world food crisis is not a fad’: The More-with-Less Cookbook and Protestant Environmental Spirituality,” in Religion and American Culture: A Journal of Interpretation 29:2 (2019)