Events

April 2019

Apr 17
3:30 pm | 114 Cocke Hall

Geoffrey Mosley, "The Arabic Plato"

Geoffrey Mosley, "The Arabic Plato"

Apr 17
3:30 pm | 114 Cocke Hall

Apr 11
12:30 PM | Lower West Oval Room of the Rotunda

Michael Gavreau, "Catholicism, Quiet Revolution, and Quebec's Two Roads to Democracy 1930-1970"

Michael Gavreau, "Catholicism, Quiet Revolution, and Quebec's Two Roads to Democracy 1930-1970"

Apr 11
12:30 PM | Lower West Oval Room of the Rotunda

Apr 04
4-5:30 pm | Nau 342

Jolyon Thomas, "Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan"

Jolyon Thomas, "Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan"

Apr 04
4-5:30 pm | Nau 342

Jolyon Thomas of the University of Pennsylvania will speak about his new book, Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan. Americans stationed in occupied Japan at the close of World War II claimed to be bringing religious freedom to a country where it did not exist. They described Japan’s 1889 constitutional guarantee of religious freedom as a fake, and they claimed to be implanting “real religious freedom” in its stead. But in making such claims, the occupiers overlooked inconvenient historical facts. Countering the victors’ narrative, Jolyon Thomas shows that Japanese people were actually involved in a robust debate about religious freedom for decades before the occupation began; he also demonstrates that the American occupiers were far less certain about how to define and protect religious freedom than their triumphalist rhetoric suggested. And whereas post-Occupation histories have commonly assumed that the occupiers introduced the human right of religious freedom to Japan, Thomas argues that the inherently transnational circumstances of military occupation prompted stakeholders to conceive religious freedom as a "human right" in the first place. Along the way, the occupiers and their Japanese counterparts collaboratively constructed a new technical vocabulary about “good” and “bad” religion. The categories they developed in the late 1940s still dictate how academics, journalists, and policymakers working today imagine who deserves religious freedom, what kinds of political practices infringe on religious liberty, and who bears responsibility for doing anything about it.

March 2019

Mar 25
12:00pm | New Cabell 236

S. Brent Plate, "The Spiritual Life of Dolls: From Golem to Automatons to AI"

S. Brent Plate, "The Spiritual Life of Dolls: From Golem to Automatons to AI"

Mar 25
12:00pm | New Cabell 236

The gods and goddesses were the first doll makers, forming humans from dirt and clay, and breathing life into the creatures. Since that time, humans have attempted to do the same by fashioning raw materials into bodies that look like ours: dolls, automatons, figurines, puppets, marionettes, and robots. But it is not enough to make them look human, we also want them to behave like humans, and so we make these bodies walk and talk, move their arms and heads, and even pray and grieve. A look at a history of dolls—from automatons to action figures to robots—provides a historical and religious backdrop to think through our cyborgian futures by showing how we have always been cyborgs, always merging with our technology. B. Brent Plate is Associate Professor, by special appointment, at Hamilton College;  the Managing Editor and Co-Founder of the journal, Material Religion; and the author of Religion and Film: Cinema and the Re-Creation of the World; A History of Religion in 51/2 Objects: Bringing the Spiritual to Its Senses; Walter Benjamin: Religion and Aesthetics: Rethinking Religion through the Arts; and Blasphemy: Art that Offends.
Mar 22
Noon | Wilson 142

Prof. Cornelia Horn, “Refractions of Revelations and Sacred Books at the Intersection of Christian Oriental Traditions and Early Islam”

Prof. Cornelia Horn, “Refractions of Revelations and Sacred Books at the Intersection of Christian Oriental Traditions and Early Islam”

Mar 22
Noon | Wilson 142

The Dissecting Cultural Pluralism Lab host Professor Cornelia Horn of Martin Luther Universität Halle-Wittenburg, who will speak on “Refractions of Revelations and Sacred Books at the Intersection of Christian Oriental Traditions and Early Islam.” Lunch will be provided. 
Mar 01
10:30am | Wilson 142

Shankar Nair, "An Iranian Wanders Early Modern India: Deciphering a Muslim Account of Hinduism"

Shankar Nair, "An Iranian Wanders Early Modern India: Deciphering a Muslim Account of Hinduism"

Mar 01
10:30am | Wilson 142

Shankar Nair, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, will give a talk entitled, "An Iranian Wanders Early Modern India: Deciphering a Muslim Account of Hinduism" as part of the Mellon Fellows Symposium. Read more about the symposium events below.   MELLON FELLOWS SYMPOSIUM (SHANKAR NAIR AND RICARDO PADRÓN)       10.30-11.30am Shankar Nair, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies "An Iranian Wanders Early Modern India: Deciphering a Muslim Account of Hinduism"   11.30am-12.30pm Ricardo Padrón, Associate Professor of Spanish “Early Modern Ethnography and Imperial Geopolitics: Framing the Boxer Codex”   12.30-1.00pm - Lunch   Shankar Nair's general field of interest is the religious and intellectual history of the Indian subcontinent, particularly as it relates to broader traditions of Sufism and Islamic philosophy, Qur'anic exegesis, and Hindu philosophy and theology (especially Advaita Vedanta and other forms of Hindu non-dualism).   Ricardo Padrón is an Associate Professor of Spanish who studies the literature and culture of the early modern Hispanic world, particularly questions of empire, space, and cartography.  Currently, he is completing a monograph about the transpacific imagination in sixteenth century Spanish imperialism. Provisionally entitled ReOrienting the Indies: Spain, the Pacific, and Asia, 1513-1609, the book will be published by the University of Chicago Press.  His research for this book has taken him to China, Japan, and the Philippines, and has been sponsored by U.Va.’s Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, Arts & Sciences at U.Va., and the National Endowment for the Humanities.  He has also published on early modern poetry and historiography, and on the mapping of imaginary worlds in modern times.  Prof. Padrón is an active member of the Renaissance Society of America, in which he has served as Disciplinary Representative for the Americas section, and of the Latin American Studies Association.

December 2018

Dec 06
12:30 - 5:15pm | Nau 342

Thinking Otherwise with Critical Theory: A Graduate Conference

Thinking Otherwise with Critical Theory: A Graduate Conference

Dec 06
12:30 - 5:15pm | Nau 342

Dec 05
12:00 | Gibson 441

Lecture by Bharati Jagannathan, "Women's Devotion, Women's Lives: Interrogating the Narratives and Poetry of Andal and Karaikkal Ammaiyar"

Lecture by Bharati Jagannathan, "Women's Devotion, Women's Lives: Interrogating the Narratives and Poetry of Andal and Karaikkal Ammaiyar"

Dec 05
12:00 | Gibson 441

November 2018

Nov 30 to Dec 01 | Begins at 9:00 a.m. each day
Wilson 142

Material of Christian Apocrypha

Material of Christian Apocrypha

Nov 30 to Dec 01 | Begins at 9:00 a.m. each day
Wilson 142

Hosted by the University of Virginia’s Department of Religious Studies and McIntire Department of Art, under the auspices of the North American Society for the Study of Christian Apocryphal Literature, this conference assembles a group of participants who will address two interrelated yet distinct topics: 1) the physicality of our apocryphal texts (i.e. various aspects of the manuscripts or papyri themselves), and 2) the representation of apocryphal narratives in other forms of material culture (e.g. frescos, mosaics, sculptures, icons, pilgrimage objects, reliquaries, etc.). By drawing our collective attention to the material aspects of the literary and the literary aspects of the material, we hope to spark a fruitful and enduring exchange between scholars and students rooted in both areas.  
Nov 30
1:30PM | Nau 342

Sigal Samuel, Religion Editor at The Atlantic, "One Million Muslims in China's Internment Camps: What can we do about it?"

Sigal Samuel, Religion Editor at The Atlantic, "One Million Muslims in China's Internment Camps: What can we do about it?"

Nov 30
1:30PM | Nau 342

Nov 09 | 12:00 p.m.
Wilson 142

Dissecting Cultural Pluralism Lab Seminar

Dissecting Cultural Pluralism Lab Seminar

Nov 09 | 12:00 p.m.
Wilson 142

The Dissecting Cultural Pluralism Lab seminar will take place this Friday, Nov. 9, at noon in Wilson 142. Three graduate students will present on their current research projects.  As their work draws on diverse fields and methods, this is sure to be an exciting preview of up-and-coming scholarship. Lunch will be provided. Speakers include: Janet Dunkelbarger, Najee Olya, and Jeannie Sellick  
Nov 07 | 12:00 p.m.
NAU 441

Professor Liz Alexander Lectures on Navigating Gender in Biblical Law

Professor Liz Alexander Lectures on Navigating Gender in Biblical Law

Nov 07 | 12:00 p.m.
NAU 441

Professor Liz Alexander will be presenting a paper titled “Who is the “He”?  Navigating Grammatical Gender in Biblical Law" today at noon in Nau 441.
Nov 05 | 12:00–1:30 p.m.
tba

Professor Maurice Wallace to Speak on "The Cantor King: Architecture, Acoustics, and Martin Luther King Jr."

Professor Maurice Wallace to Speak on "The Cantor King: Architecture, Acoustics, and Martin Luther King Jr."

Nov 05 | 12:00–1:30 p.m.
tba

On August 27, 1967 at Mt. Pisgah Missionary Bapist Church in Chicago, King preached a sermon title “Why Jesus Called a Man a Fool” based on a Lukan parable. Considered one of King’s “great” sermons, the success of King’s sermonic performance of “Why Jesus Called a Man a Fool” relied in part on the acoustical design and sonic memory of the former Jewish synagogue where the preaching event took place.  This talk traces the early history of Mt. Pisgah to two prominent Jewish Chicagoans, an architect, Alfred S. Alschuler (1876-1940) and a rabbi, the “radical reformer” Emil Gustav Hirsch (1851-1923).  The space designed by Alschuler to maximize the dynamic preaching of Hirch at then-Sinai Congregation was acoustically well-suited to King’s own “reform” preaching a half-century later.

Spring 2019 Course Registrations Have Begun

Spring 2019 Course Registrations Have Begun



Check out the religious studies course offerings.

October 2018

Oct 22
Nau 342, 4pm

Professor John Stratton Hawley, "Between Poem and Painting: Krishna now showing at the VMFA, Richmond"

Professor John Stratton Hawley, "Between Poem and Painting: Krishna now showing at the VMFA, Richmond"

Oct 22
Nau 342, 4pm

A Week of Events with Professor Jan Bremmer

A Week of Events with Professor Jan Bremmer



The Dissecting Cultural Pluralism Lab is hosting four events with visiting scholar Jan Bremmer, Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies at the University of Groningen. All are welcome to attend.  Tuesday, Oct. 16: Classics Seminar on Euripides, New Cab 64, 11am Wednesday, Oct. 17: Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity Colloquium, "Author, Date, and Provenance of the Protoevangelium Jacobi," Nau 441, 1pm Wednesday, Oct. 17: Public Lecture, “Religious Pluralism in the Ancient World: Herodotus, the Roman Republic, and Late Antiquity,” Gibson Room, Cocke Hall, 5pm. Reception to follow. Friday, Oct. 19: Lab Talk, “Early Christians in Corinth (AD 50-200): Religious Insiders or Outsiders?” Wilson 142, 12pm. Lunch provided.  
Oct 15 | 5:30 p.m.
NAU 342

Blessing America First: Religion, Foreign Policy, and the Trump Presidency

Blessing America First: Religion, Foreign Policy, and the Trump Presidency

Oct 15 | 5:30 p.m.
NAU 342

Professor David Buckley, UVA Alumnus and Assocate Professor of Political Science at the University of Louisville, will give a lecture entitled, "Blessing America First: Religion, Foreign Policy, and the Trump Presidency" at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, October 15, in Nau 342. This lecture is sponsored by the UVA Intiative on Religion, Politics ad Conflict.
Oct 12
12:30pm in Nau 342

Osmund Bopearachchi speaks on "Diffusion of Buddhist Philosophies and Art Along the Maritime Silk Routes"

Osmund Bopearachchi speaks on "Diffusion of Buddhist Philosophies and Art Along the Maritime Silk Routes"

Oct 12
12:30pm in Nau 342

Oct 12
3pm in Monroe 116

Osmund Bopearachchi speaks on "“Greek Inspirations on Early Buddhist Art in Gandhara (Ancient India)”

Osmund Bopearachchi speaks on "“Greek Inspirations on Early Buddhist Art in Gandhara (Ancient India)”

Oct 12
3pm in Monroe 116

Oct 02
3:30pm Nau 142

Professor Claudrina Harold, "No Ordinary Sacrifice: The Struggle for Racial Justice at the University of Virginia in the Post-Civil Rights Era"

Professor Claudrina Harold, "No Ordinary Sacrifice: The Struggle for Racial Justice at the University of Virginia in the Post-Civil Rights Era"

Oct 02
3:30pm Nau 142

September 2018

Sep 14
Nau Hall, 4:00 - 5:30pm

Faith, Spirituality, and Public Life with Tim Kaine

Faith, Spirituality, and Public Life with Tim Kaine

Sep 14
Nau Hall, 4:00 - 5:30pm

Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA) is coming to UVA to discuss the role religion should play in public life and how issues of faith, morality, values, and community relate to political movements on both sides of the aisle. He will explore where compassion and ethics fit into national political debates, and how this might help to bridge a deeply divided electorate. Along with CSC, this event is co-sponsored by the Miller Center, the Department of Religious Studies, and the Virginia Center for the Study of Religion. To attend, REGISTER HERE.

August 2018

Aug 29 | 10:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Purcell Reading Room, School of Law

Liberalism's Religion: A Conversation with Cécile Laborde

Liberalism's Religion: A Conversation with Cécile Laborde

Aug 29 | 10:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Purcell Reading Room, School of Law

Liberalism’s Religion: A CONVERSATION WITH CÉCILE LABORDE Sponsored by The Project on Religion and Its Publics, Virginia Center for the Study of Religion and the University of Virginia School of Law PURCELL READING ROOM 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Panel: “Liberalism and Disestablishment of Religion” LORI WATSON UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO MICAH SCHWARTZMAN UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF LAW 2:15-4:15 p.m. Panel: “Liberalism and the Limits of Religious Accommodations” STANLEY FISH FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY ALAN PATTEN PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 4:30-5:30 p.m. Author Reply and General Discussion Wednesday, Aug. 29

April 2018

Apr 27 | 3:00-4:30pm
Gibson 441

Hanna Reichel, "Big Data and Providence: 'Political Theologies of Omniscience in the Digital Age'”

Hanna Reichel, "Big Data and Providence: 'Political Theologies of Omniscience in the Digital Age'”

Apr 27 | 3:00-4:30pm
Gibson 441

Hanna Reichel, Associate Professor of Reformed Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary, will deliver a paper, "Big Data and Providence: Political Theologies of Omniscience in the Digital Age.”  Professor Reichel holds a B.Sc. in economics and an MDiv/ThD in Theology. Her theological dissertation “Theologie als Bekenntnis: Karl Barth's kontextuelle Lektüre des Heidelberger Katechismus” received the Lautenschläger Award for Theological Promise and the Ernst Wolf Award of the Gesellschaft für evangelische Theologie. Her scholarly interests include Christology, scriptural hermeneutics, political theology, constructive theology, and poststructuralist theory. She is currently working on a major project about “Political Theologies of Omniscience” in conversations between the doctrine of God and emergent surveillance cultures.
Apr 24 | 2:00pm
Bonhoeffer House at 1841 University Circle

Patricia Hampl, "The Art of the Wasted Day"

Patricia Hampl, "The Art of the Wasted Day"

Apr 24 | 2:00pm
Bonhoeffer House at 1841 University Circle

Apr 20 | 9:30am - 12:45pm
Newcomb Hall Art Gallery

Toppling Monuments: A Symposium on History, Memory, and the Power of Images

Toppling Monuments: A Symposium on History, Memory, and the Power of Images

Apr 20 | 9:30am - 12:45pm
Newcomb Hall Art Gallery

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